What losing my phone taught me about myself

No, it’s not about my pointless Insta stories.

What losing my smartphone taught me about myself | Chai High is an Indian blog started by Shivani KrishanLess than 24 hours after I prided myself on my independence, my cell phone crashed. Ordinarily, this would seem like two separate instances—a woman’s independence and a rectangular handheld gadget—but it wasn’t quite so simple. The fleeting sense of achievement I’d experienced was entirely dependent on Uber, a car booking app, and Google Maps. I was alone in Chandigarh for the very first time, and I was relying on the good sense and navigation expertise of my Uber driver, and my ability to read Google Maps, to deliver me in one piece to my ailing grandmother. And I was mighty proud of myself at that. So, a day later, when my phone died, it took away my independence, sense of empowerment and feeling of being in control. The ground beneath my feet had shifted. And this raised a few questions in my mind about the extent to which we rely on technology today.

It’s interesting how the smart phone has enabled the independence of women. In a new city? Find your way with Google Maps. Don’t have a car? Book an Uber. Hungry? Order on Swiggy. Don’t know where to stay? Book an Airbnb. Want to pay a bill? Choose Netbanking. Unlike paper maps, regular taxis, restaurant home delivery and hotels, these “apps” are accountable if your driver misbehaves, food is contaminated, or room is dirty. And with users giving ratings and writing firsthand reviews, it only adds to the feeling of empowerment, when you make a choice based on your deduction of the average opinion of 14910 others. It’s hard to explain the feeling of elation you get on landing the ideal balance of an above average rating that also fits in your budget. Therefore, it was only natural, that when my source of empowerment and entertainment stopped functioning, I felt like a lost child.

But is this healthy? The fact that we no longer remember phone numbers, that addresses have lost their meaning, that our sense of direction is dependent on an electronic voice, that we constantly need to check our phones for WhatsApp messages and memes from friends, to validate our existence? Many would hands down say no. After all, isn’t it a sign of severe deterioration of cognitive ability to no longer be able to memorize phone numbers or recall directions? Whatever happened to the feeling of joy on locating an address based on a “landmark” from which you were to take the second left, cross the fifth vegetable seller and then look for a black gate–“no not the large one, but the smaller bling-and-miss one”—and then take a U turn to arrive at your destination? Whatever happened to good ol’ talking to people over the phone rather than half-hearted WhatsApp texts and Instagram DMs that are often “read” and not replied to?

It’s hard to argue with the logic.

Nevertheless, all the cognition required in earlier days to traverse new grounds only kept us from venturing beyond our comfort zones. For, if we were lost and didn’t have a cell phone, how were we to call for help, WhatsApp our live location to a friend or google map our way to the nearest familiar space? Unsurprisingly, rarely did women venture beyond the familiar when travelling alone, and even when they did, they’d dare not travel after sunset. Today, we travel at all hours of the day and night, within the country and abroad, and often take off into open roads and unknown streets, by Google mapping our way.

Which brings me to the “godsent” smartphone, a device I openly dissed and loved to mock, until I was left without it, in an unfamiliar city. The thing is, I had always associated phones with phone calls, social media narcissism–#ootds and #wanderlusts, and text messages, things I was happy to forgo as an experiment, for a limited amount of time. What I was unprepared for, was losing out on Uber, Google Maps, Netbanking, Airplane ticket download, E-Aadhar card and the fact that, increasingly, almost every transaction required an OTP. What I was also not expecting, was losing out on my independence.

The sense of invincibility, I’d felt as I made my way in a relatively unknown city to my grand mum’s quarters in an Uber, Google-mapping the directions, was replaced with a feeling of complete disorientation and dread when my phone blanked out. Which made it clear that I am only as independent and empowered as my smartphone. Take it away, and I am a nothing person. Does this mean, I have a false sense of self? That I am not really as independent as I think I am? That I am only as smart, independent and empowered as my smartphone allows me to be? That, by being dependent on my phone, I am simply entrusting a gadget the place previous generations granted their husbands and fathers? That it’s time to end this toxic relationship disguised as a happily-ever-after? That it’s finally time to break up?

Since I respect my phone too much to ghost it, I should probably just start getting really “busy”.

 

 

 

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How I, a 20-something girl, started wearing sarees to work

I almost missed my graduation ceremony because I was at the salon to get my saree draped. I didn’t trust the “eyebrow didi” (who had enthusiastically agreed to help every single girl who’d asked her in the days leading up to D-day) to find time for the relatively soft-spoken me. And I most definitely did not trust my mother’s off-white silk saree in the hands of my 21-year-old classmates who’d have a better chance of accidentally throwing the nine yards in a fictitious paper shredder than managing to get halfway through a draping exercise. So, I ended up missing my batch photograph, and just about made it to collect my certificate and award.

Five years later, today, I can (almost) drape a saree in my sleep and get through a day without fearing a minor wardrobe malfunction every time I have to do a little more than breathe. So, what brought about this shift? Apart from an all-prevailing boredom with the contents of my closet (yes, really), an innate need to experiment with my look, and one of Anavila’s earlier shows (where linen sarees actually looked super comfy!), it was an admiration of the simple elegance with which the Maharashtrian ladies on the local trains carried themselves; their neatly parted hair, gajras, gold hoops and sensibly draped sarees (no floating pallus, please) inspired in me the need to emulate their effortless aesthetic. I found myself wanting to normalise the act of wearing a saree on an ordinary day, to put it in the same league as a bright floral dress or a pair of jeans.

This combined with a lifetime of admiring my mother every time she emerged from her boudoir in a saree, and having two grandmothers with diverse aesthetics—fluttering chiffons and ornate, heirloom jewellery on one side, and starched kota sarees with pearls on the other—helped nudge me into the saree-wearing world armed with a mishmash aesthetic that, I believe, is clearly my own.

Around the same time as I was beginning to consider the possibility of wearing a saree on an ordinary day, I was just about finding my personal sense of style. Increasingly, I was gravitating towards handlooms, linens, and cottons, with skirts and dresses tailored out of traditional textiles and weaves. A trial of one of my mother’s Bhutanese skirts brought about this shift—I had nothing to wear one time, and she happily lent a skirt to me, mainly because it was a far cry from the shorter lengths I would sport at the time. Reminiscent of lungis, straight cut and ankle length, my mother’s “skirts” could be considered the transitional outfit that helped ease me into wearing a saree.

It took me several attempts of putting on a saree only to discard it seconds after, till I mustered up the courage to ignore the nagging feeling of doubt and reach work. As expected, the initial reaction in a legging and denim-wearing world was, “Puja at home?” But when I told them no, I wore this of my own accord, to mix things up, the response was heart-warming. I was bombarded with compliments all day, with people going as far as saying I should wear sarees every day! By the end, I was encouraged, and my confidence was at an all-time high. “I can do this”, I thought to myself.

I started my saree-wearing journey with a single white cotton. Within a few months, I had added a black version to the mix. A year later, my school friend decided to gift me a black and white cotton saree. Now, I knew, I was a saree wearer! Soon, I was rummaging through my mother’s closet, picking up hand-painted and hand-embroidered versions that had been handed down to her by her mother. I realised, I had a “type”. Dull, “ugly”, sarees, that no one my age would be caught dead in!

What helped in normalising the saree, was making the drape as comfortable as possible. Think shorter lengths, pinned pleats and compact pallus that could be swung around, teamed with loose blouses or tank tops for a relaxed, easy vibe. Also, staying as close to my everyday slightly-undone aesthetic—messy hair and everything—helped me feel like me, by emphasising that I had not been airlifted from a puja and dropped off at work. With time, I got bolder, and added sneakers and bright socks to the mix (such fun!).

People still tell me “Only you can pull it off”, to which I tell them, “So can you”, not out of politeness, but because I strongly believe everyone can take a saree and make it their own. For me, simple cottons work well, because I tend to add interest with sneakers and a random hairdo. For you, bright printed chiffons with Grecian sandals and poker straight hair, may work wonders. Or a starched kota with a crisp and sheer organza blouse and leather broguesOr a plain georgette saree with a matching georgette blouse and simple thong sandals. But you have to try it to believe it.

Once you find your very own kind of everyday-friendly drape, you’ll find yourself looking grudgingly at denims and leggings, dresses will no longer occupy prime real estate in your wardrobe, and a whole new world will open up in the form of frilly petticoats, crop tops, statement blouses that double up as underpinnings for a solid saree, and jewellery! You’ll begin to see every new trend in the context of a saree. Soon, questions like this will fill your mind: Can I team a corset belt with a crepe saree? Can I wear an off-shoulder, peasant top with a simple mul saree? Can I add ruffles to my blouse? And, just like that, you will have one more option to choose from, every morning. And who amongst us, apart from the Steve Jobs-inspired, does not want yet another outfit choice?


 

 

13 letters to body parts written by surprisingly sporting men.

The reason I say “surprisingly sporting” is probably based on a little ignorance on my part. I had assumed that men won’t be as sporting as women when it came to writing about their bodies. That they’d laugh at me for even asking. So, for weeks, I contemplated if I should indeed do a “Letters to Body Parts – Men” like I’d done this one with women.

But, at some point, I decided it was worth a try. I thought to myself – if I got men to open up about their feelings with regards to their bodies, I’d have helped kickstart an important conversation.

And I was in for a pleasant surprise – most men I spoke to didn’t need much convincing (those that did – well, their letters haven’t made it here – they didn’t write). 

Men were more than happy to share their stories of love, hate, exasperation and gratefulness towards their bodies. While some have written longer, beautifully-articulated letters, others have penned fun poems and sweet, little thank you notes.

And mind you – not all men featured here are writers and poets. There are copywriters (obviously), but there are also sales-people, IIT-IIM geniuses, brand strategists, PHD scholars, designers, and directors. There are letters by 26-year-olds and those by 40-year-olds. And if there’s one thing all these lovely people have in common, it is the incredible self-confidence and a deep sense of self-awareness to be able to put themselves out there with their words.

Do take the time out to read each beautifully-crafted letter. It will make you smile.

Dear Calves | Letters to Body Parts | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Left Brain | Letters from Men to their body parts | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Wiggly, Jiggly, Juicy Bum | Letters from Men to their body parts | Dear Bum | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Voice | Hi Voice | Letters from Men to their body parts | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Hands | Letters from Men to their body parts | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Brain | Letters from Men to their organs and body parts | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Tummy | Letters from Men to their organs and body parts | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Shoulders | Letters from Men to their organs and body parts | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Overthinking Mind | Letters from Men to their organs and body parts | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Butt | Letters from Men to their organs and body parts | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Hair | Letters from Men to their organs and body parts | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Brain | Hey | Letters from Men to their organs and body parts | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

Dear Nails | I hate you | Hey | Letters from Men to their organs and body parts | Notes to the self | Chai High is an Indian Blog started by Shivani Krishan

If you made it till here, thank you. Also, if this post inspired you to think about your most prized body part or the most frustrating one – do pen down your thoughts, turn them into letters and mail it to me at schivany@gmail.com. I will do another post soon.

Have a happy weekend. 🙂

Cheers,

Shivani

 

 

 

Dear Designers – Here’s some inspiration for 2017.

Hello People-who-want-to-design-something-but-don’t-know-what,

I’ve been in your boat. A boat lost in the Pinterest sea. So many pretty ideas. But which one to choose?

I have been attempting to design a few Indian outfits to wear to weddings – since everybody has suddenly decided to get married in the first half of 2017. And while my Masterji like all Masterjis is being a bit of a tantrum queen, a glimpse at his creations sort of makes it worth the wait.

Since frills and ruffles are going to be big in 2017, why not incorporate these elements into your Indian outfit?

2017 Trends | Inspiration for Fashion Designers | Fashion Design Ideas | Fashion Week Inspo | Pinterest Fashion Ideas | Design your dream saree and lehenga blouse | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

A little layer here, a flounce there, and you’ve got a lehenga that transcends cultures.

2017 Trends | Inspiration for Fashion Designers | Fashion Design Ideas | Fashion Week Inspo | Pinterest Fashion Ideas | Design your dream saree and lehenga | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan | Bridal Trends | Wedding Fashion Ideas

Embroideries on dresses are back. Especially the interplay of embellishment with sheers and overlaying it on strategically placed opaques.

Embroideries | Filling Stitch | Satin Stitch | Colourful Embroidery on Black | 2017 Trends | Inspiration for Fashion Designers | Fashion Design Ideas | Fashion Week Inspo | Pinterest Fashion Ideas | Design your dream saree and lehenga | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan | Bridal Trends | Wedding Fashion Ideas

Mixed textures are the rage, be it in the form of applique, or pairing contrasting fabrics together.

Fabrics | Mixed Textures | Embroideries | Embellishments | Indianwear | Indian Designers | 2017 Trends | Inspiration for Fashion Designers | Fashion Design Ideas | Fashion Week Inspo | Pinterest Fashion Ideas | Design your dream saree and lehenga | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan | Bridal Trends | Wedding Fashion Ideas

The off-shoulder trend ruled the western world. And while Manish Malhotra and Payal Singhal have brought it to India, a lot of scope for experimentation still remains.

Off-shoulder | Cold shoulder | Shoulder show | Frills | Indian off shoulder blouses | Saree Blouse Inspiration | Ethnicwear | Traditional clothes | Embellished blouses | Manish Malhotra |  Indianwear | Indian Designers | 2017 Trends | Inspiration for Fashion Designers | Fashion Design Ideas | Fashion Week Inspo | Pinterest Fashion Ideas | Design your dream saree and lehenga | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan | Bridal Trends | Wedding Fashion Ideas

There’s tons of inspiration out there. But sometimes, you need someone to put it all in order.

Someone like me. 😉

Have a fun weekend.

 

 

One Week Of Style

Hello generous-followers-who-actually (hopefully)-read-my-blog,

I’ve started this thing on Instagram. You know, one of those hashtag contest/activity like things. Thanks to everybody’s suggestions to do something meaningful, something with an “idea” otherwise, I’ll drown in the sea of packed-like-sardines hashtags with no real engagement.

Anyway, so I came up with this BRILLIANT idea (right!) to post a picture of what I wore for a week and (yes, so smart isn’t it) I encouraged others to share their outfits too, for the gigantic reward on being featured on MY blog. Yes, you heard me. MY blog.

And, the hashtag I came up with for this exciting, new idea *roll-eye-emoticon* was #OneWeekOfStyle.

So original.

The interesting thing in this entire story is probably the fact that every one of these pictures will be taken in the exact same spot (Don’t ask me where. Shhh…my office loo), and hence it will lead in to a fun GIF at the end.

Anyway, so since I started this thing on Tuesday, I have just put up 3 pictures on Insta right now. Here they are.

You too, can participate in this humble (but fun) initiative and after a week, won’t it be exciting to see what you wore?

You can even compare looks, hairstyles and see your varying styles. I think, it’s fun.

Day 1:

Plaid Dress: Forever 21 | Sandals: Charles and Keith

I wore my plaid school girl forever 21 dress with Charles and Keith Sandals | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan
Once in a while, it’s fun to work school girl chic. Hello quarter-life crisis.

 

Day 2:

Black basic vest: Forever 21 | Black handloom skirt: Designed by mom

I wear basics from high street labels with indigenous, handcrafted fabrics | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan
How I wore high-street with Indian handicraft. *feeling cool*

Day 3:

Midi Dress: Cotton-on | Kolhapuri Slip-ons: Linking Road, Bandra

I wore my black midi dress with slits with Gold kolhapuri slip-ons and a statement pendant | Chai High is an Indian Fashion blog started by Shivani Krishan
Does it really look like I forgot to wear pants? Because, people often think I did. Also I wouldn’t admit it, but in my head I agree with those who called it a kurta without salwar. 

In one shot, here are my 3 looks.

 

To participate, all you have to do is upload your pictures on Instagram using the hashtag #OneWeekOfStyle.

Chalo, I got to go and work.

tata.

On the importance of being thick-skinned and well-dressed

I first heard the term “thick-skinned” when I was in school. As a gawky 12 year old, hearing a lanky senior (one with braces I think) look at us and yell, “How thick are you”, elicited more smirks than fear. And, then of course, I’d be up standing, punished, with two or three other girls for the “audacity to smirk” while we were being spoken to.

I wish smirks came more easily to me now.

The thing is, when you start working, when you pack your bags and leave the comfort of bed-tea and “Baby khana laga liya hai” (Dinner is ready) for “Dude, it was your turn to get the milk” and “muesli for breakfast- lunch-dinner”,  you change too.

I don’t know. Maybe the food you eat determines your skin thickness. Maybe having domestic help and a “bawarchi” who can bake cookies and cakes and make fantastic grilled chicken, thickens your skin to immense proportions. Maybe, it’s boarding school and 30 other girls who smirk and giggle with you at annoying seniors and turn their noses with you over “dumb bimbos” (yeah, no one told you, even you’d go through the “bimbo” phase) makes you invincible in your mind.

Hell, yeah. What could be worse than being boycotted in school. Right?

Wrong.

I don’t know whether life is indeed much tougher now, or my skin’s just lost its thickness (I think it’s the latter), but a lot of it stems from the mind.

Somehow in our heads, we all have this perfect impression of how life after school is supposed to be. You know. Like you walk into college. And you meet the best friends. You go on an open jeep to Goa and sing songs. You date a few losers but it’s cool. And then you graduate. Everybody is happy. You are nervous about finding a job. You think if you find something good, your “life is set”. So once you find your dream job, you think nothing can go wrong. People at work will just accept you to submit work like you did your assignments. And soon, they shall realise what a shining star you are with your dedication and your hard-work and your brilliant ass from which you shit stars and rainbows…

BULLSHIT.

Before you walk into the corporate world, you’d better make sure you’re skin’s as thick as an elephant’s hide. Yes, you heard me.

Because, girl, people are going to talk. And talk they will of your clothes, your skin, your social-ness and your anti-socialness. Of your secret affairs, your not-so-secret-affairs and of course, the worst, your work. The work you pride yourself on, the work, that teachers in school praised you for.  The work that won you contests and awards. And the work, that the corporate world will reduce to a snigger, a jibe, an-offhand remark over the lunch table that’ll cause everyone listening to snigger and roll their eyes, a certain pride in them not being on the other end.

Yes. that’ll happen.

And no, work won’t always be like school. It won’t always be go to school, come back, read, chill enjoy. You will stress about promotions. You will stress about a bitchy boss, a competitive colleague and most of all, about how you think you are perceived by others. Which is why, GET THICKER SKIN GIRLS.

And, you will see your school friends on TV, you will see them buying a house, shopping at Louis Vuitton, travelling around the world, having the dream wedding, being featured in newspapers, eating out at the fanciest restaurants in the city, their skin like porcelain and bodies like figurines… their daddies like ATMs and husbands like Mr. Greys.

And your parents shall look at you expecting more.

Their one look saying the dreaded, “What did we make you study so much for, if you’re still going to ask us for money?”

So you don’t ask them for money. You don’t get your increment in time. And your maid wants you to pay her more because well, maid problems.

And nobody told you, you’ll have to deal with this.

Yes. Nobody said you’ll go to work and come back so tired that even though the travel websites and the BuzzFeeds of the world yell at you to “quit your job” and “do what you always wanted to do” and other surrealist-inspired nonsense (that you partially followed), you will end up slouched on your bed, passing out in between an episode of House of Cards hugging a bowl of oats lying half-eaten by your pillow.

And bills. Yes. Everybody always seems to forget the bills when they are dishing out “aspirational” advice through movies and websites. Go, join a “water-yoga”class, go “travel someplace to get lost”. Yeah. Right. Who’s going to pay for this? My Daddy?

Or me on my creative person’s meagre salary, a profession, that you advocated because guess what, “Follow your dream and forget the money and do what makes you happy.”

All of life, one big oxymoron.

The example of a handful who’ve “made it” setting unrealistic goals and expectations on those of us who haven’t. And selective revelation of just the candy-flossiness of other people’s lives lead us to find gaping holes in our own.

So, what if, we just did away with all this nonsense? What if we trained ourselves to get thicker skin, and woke up in the morning as though preparing for battle?  What if we armed ourselves up with the hottest clothes, the toughest jewellery and an unshakeable mind?

Cause this isn’t life, girls. This is war.

 

And, you don’t need to walk around town with a silly grin plastered on your face, as the “Be positive” rants online tell you to do. “Smile, come what may”, “expect good and good shall happen”… No, you need to be realistic, cause “shit is going to go down.” Might as well prepare for war, and if you get roses in return, you’ll truly appreciate it as you weren’t expecting it from the start. Know what I mean?

So, tomorrow when you wake up, walk to your wardrobe and pick your fanciest armour for the day. High heels or boots, little dresses or distressed denims, spaghetti straps or silk stockings. Pick your armour, wear it like a boss, and step out of your house, skin thickened, body dressed and mind ready for battle.

_ _ _

I am sure a lot of people may have contrasting points of view to this opinion feature. Feel free to start a discussion. I look forwards to hearing what you all have got to say.

 

 

The 15 best Instagrams on my feed right now.

So I recently discovered how to get more people to see my Instagram posts. “Hashtag Marketing” they call it. So basically, there are these specific hashtags that are trending. And you need to find the relevant ones and just post it with your update.

Ta da! And just like that from a maximum of 21 likes per post, I have gone to a maximum of 133 likes. And God knows how many views. In just two weeks. Oh, now, that sounds like a tele-marketing commercial. 😉

Anyway, ever since a friend told me how to leverage this magic-tool, one that I really turned my nose down upon once, I have been posting left, right and centre. And hash-tagging everything left, right and centre too.

“Yes. Come on. You can fit one more hashtag, Shivani. Yeah. See.”

#StyleInspo #FashionInspo #OutfitInspo #LookInspo

Just #Inspo

Make every goddamn thing Inspo.

#ShivaniInspo

And many people have unfollowed me too, I guess. *sigh*

With my discovery of the wonder-tool, came the discovery of the “right” Instagram handles to follow.

Like Man Repeller. That Boho Girl. etc. etc.

You can follow me here. (It’s honestly not that bad. I think, you will like it.)

Anyway. Here’s what’s really hot on my Instagram feed right now. You can click on the names to be directed to their respective Instagram pages.

  1. Amrapali Jaipur

Amrapali Jewels' update on Chai High's Instagram home | Chai High is an Indian fashion blog started by Shivani Krishan.

2. Jaypore

Indian online website Jaypore on Chai High's Instagram home page | Chai High is an Indian fashion blog started by Shivani Krishan.

3. VOGUE India

Vogue India does a kurta makeover in this cool Instagram update | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

4. New Outfitters

Super torn denims look so much cooler on Instagram | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

5. Smrti Srivastava

A shirt worn backwards. Now doesn't that look awesome. | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan.

6. Balmain

Balmain does a mesh top and football earrings for their Instagram page | Don't miss the model's septum piercing | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

7. Blaireadiebee

Orange heels meets white tunic meets blue jeans | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

8. Man Repeller

Man Repeller's awesome look for Instagram | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

9. Pallavi of That Desi Girl Blog

That Desi Girl teams a happy check jumpsuit with a hair band | Her beautiful long hair is the 'desi' in every picture | Chai High is an Indian Fashion blog started by Shivani Krishan

10. Kritika of That Boho Girl

That Boho Girl gets Color-popping right | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

11. Amanda Shadforth

The White Sneaker trend shows no sign of dying | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

12. Song of style

Loving the flowers and tasselled sandals in this Instagram post | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

13. Nicole Warne

Love the fun-loving pose in this Instagram shot | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

14. Scott Schuman of The Sartorialist

Black knee-high socks, black boots, grey shirt and an afro | The perfect look | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

15. SALT.BY.SIMO

Love the top view angle in this Instagram update | Chai High is an Indian Fashion Blog started by Shivani Krishan

So, what did you think? I loved all of these posts and more. Do click on the handles you like and explore more posts.

And, in case you still don’t follow me on Instagram, here‘s a link. 🙂

Goodbye. And Happy Thursday to you.